More Cat Care Information:

Most cats get ear mites at one time or another. Cats with ear mites are miserable with symptoms of head shaking, itching and scratching the ears. Hundreds of these tiny bugs are invading your cat's ear canal living off the wax. A mite's life cycle is three weeks and then they start mating all over again. Ear mites are extremely contagious and spread from one cat to another through direct contact.

General Cat Care #1: Before You Bring Your Cat Home
You will need food, food dish, water bowl, interactive toys, brush, comb, safety cat collar, scratching post, litter and litter box.
General Cat Care #2: Feeding
An adult cat should be fed one large or two smaller meals each day. Kittens from 6 to 12 weeks need to be fed four times a day. Kittens from three to six months need to be fed three times a day. You can either feed specific meals, throwing away any leftover canned food after 30 minutes or free-feed dry food (keeping food out all the time).

Feed your cat a high-quality, brand-name kitten or cat food (avoid generic brands) two to three times a day. Kittens can be fed human baby food for a short time if they won’t eat kitten food softened by soaking in warm water. Use turkey or chicken baby food made for children six months and older. Gradually mix with cat food. Cow’s milk is not necessary and can cause diarrhea in kittens and cats. Provide fresh, clean water at all times. Wash and refill water bowls daily.

Ear mites are the most difficult parasite to get rid of, but by following a specific treatment, your cat will be ear mite free. If not treated, they can cause ear infections, inflamed red swollen ears or even hearing loss to your cat. Some cats have lost their hearing from vigorous head shaking causing a blood vessel to burst.

To check your cat for ear mites, use a cotton swab dipped in mineral or vegetable oil. Fold the ear flap back and wipe the cotton ball in the ear. If there is black debris or a thick coffee grind like substance on the cotton swab, then your cat has ear mites. Clean the kitty's ears first with vegetable or mineral oil or you can buy a cleaning solution at PetSmart. Clean the ears as directed on the bottle. Always clean the cat's ears first before treating her for ear mites.

There are a few different remedies for cats with ear mites. You can use the conventional method or the holistic approach. The easiest treatment is to visit your veterinarian and get a topical anti-parasitic medication such as Revolution.

It kills fleas as well as ear mites. It is a spot on vial tube that is applied between the shoulder blade and it lasts for one month. Acarexx or Milbermite are two other conventional topical medications you may choose to use. These conventional medications include “pyrethrins” which are an insecticide that penetrates the nervous system of the parasites.

General Cat Care #3: Grooming
Most cats stay relatively clean and rarely need a bath, but they do need to be brushed or combed. Frequent brushing helps keep your cat’s coat clean, reduces the amount of shedding and cuts down on the incidence of hairballs
General Cat Care #4: Handling
To pick up your cat, place one hand behind the front legs and another under the hindquarters. Lift gently. Never pick up a cat by the scruff of the neck (behind the ears) or by the front legs without supporting the rear end.
General Cat Care #5: Housing
Cats should have a clean, dry place of their own in the house. Line your cat’s bed with a soft, warm blanket or towel. Be sure to wash the bedding often. Please keep your cat indoors. If your companion animal is allowed outside, he can contract diseases, get ticks or parasites, become lost or get hit by a car, hurt in a fight or poisoned. Also, cats prey on wildlife.

The safest approach is the natural treatment with no chemicals. This is not the easiest way, but is the safest alternative to chemical products. Clean your cat's ears with one tablespoon of Olive Oil and 1 capsule of Vitamin E combined. (Poke the capsule and pour the gel in with the olive oil)

Use an equal amount in a syringe and squirt in the cat's ears and spread it out. Wait for five minutes, massage base of the ear with your thumb and forefinger and then wipe out the mite debris with a cotton swab. Repeat this process daily for seven days.

The Olive Oil smothers the mites and the Vitamin E heals the ears. Another treatment is by using white vinegar and water. Dilute solution to half and half. Use one teaspoon in a dropper or syringe in each ear. Cup your hand around the base of your kitty's ear, and massage the base of her ear with your thumb and forefinger.

Use cotton swabs to wipe out the mite debris. Use this for seven days and then stop for seven days. WARNING: Do not use this method if the ears are red and swollen or have any open wounds.

Garlic and Olive Oil combined are great for treating ear mites. Crush garlic and soak it overnight in warm olive oil. Throw away the clove and warm up the olive oil. Add 5 drops to each ear for 21 days. This remedy also smothers the ear mites.

My favorite is Aloe and Calendula essential oils. They are very soothing to the kitty's ears and have worked wonders for getting rid of the ear mites. Both oils are available at your local health food store. Add several drops to the kitty's ears once daily for 21 days. The oils have a healing effect so if your kitty has inflamed or painful ears, this will help.

These are the best remedies for cats with ear mites and now you can choose the conventional or the holistic approach. Your cat will feel much better and she will love you for it.

General Cat Care #6: Identification
If allowed outdoors (again, we caution against it!), your cat needs to wear a safety collar and an ID tag. A safety collar with an elastic panel will allow your cat to break loose if the collar gets caught on something. An ID tag or an implanted microchip can help insure that your cat is returned if he or she becomes lost.
General Cat Care #7: Litter Box
All indoor cats need a litter box, which should be placed in a quiet, accessible location. A bathroom or utility room is a good place for your cat’s box. In a multi-level home, one box per floor is recommended. Avoid moving the box unless absolutely necessary. Then do so slowly, a few inches a day. Cats won’t use a messy, SMELLY litter box. Scoop solids out of the box at least once a day. Dump everything, wash with a mild detergent (don’t use ammonia) and refill at least once a week, less frequently if using clumping litter. Don’t use deodorants or scents in the litter or litter box (especially avoid lemon scent).
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